Roster change

President Bush intends to nominate John Marburger III as national science adviser, the White House announced June 25.

As assistant to the president for science and technology, Marburger will also serve as director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy. OSTP provides high-level advice to the White House on technology issues ranging from distance learning to security and privacy. It also coordinates with independent industry and academic research organizations, such as the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee.

Marburger has been director of the Energy Department's Brookhaven National Laboratory since 1998.

For more, see "Bush lines up science adviser" [FCW.com, June 26, 2001].

***

Also last week, President Bush nominated:

* Nancy Victory to be assistant secretary of the Commerce Department for communications and information, replacing Gregory Rohde.

* Claude Kicklighter to be an assistant secretary of Veterans Affairs for policy and planning.

***

Larry Irving, former assistant secretary of Commerce for communications and information, has joined the Privacy Council Inc. as a principal, the company announced last month. Irving expands the consulting firm's Washington, D.C., presence and will serve as the Privacy Council's global adviser on telecom privacy issues.

Irving was a key member of the Clinton administration's team that reformed the United States' telecommunications law, which resulted in the passage of the Telecommunications Act of 1996.

For more on Irving, see "NTIA Administrator to Launch Two Private-Sector Ventures" [civic.com, Sept. 30, 1999].

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