Letter to the Editor

It was with no little amusement that I read Ray Applebaum's June 25 letter ("Military across-the-board increase best"). Since he appears to be an expert qualified to comment on Milt Zall's alleged lack of understanding of personnel management, I find it amusing that he says he is "unaware" of any retention problems in civil service.

With the ever-increasing mandated civil service reductions performed in order to outsource services to contractors (for example, his own employer, EER Systems), any supposed absence of a "retention problem" is quite obviously due to the fact that not only do Mr. Applebaum and company perform that work currently, but they also stand to gain even more as additional government services are transferred from civil service to the private sector. A classic case of blaming the victim.(Naturally, it is strictly coincidental that it is also to his personal advantage and has absolutely nothing whatsoever to do with the supposed subject of across-the-board military pay raises <chuckle<.)

Additionally, Mr. Applebaum's back-handed slap about wishing to avoid comment concerning comparisons of military vs. civil service was totally undeserved in my not-so-humble opinion. Had he truly wanted to avoid comment, he would simply have done so, instead of saying, "Of course I would never say anything about this, BUT..."

Bill Nichols
96th Medical Group
Air Force

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