Cybercenter funding may fall short

FedCIRC

Related Links

Although governmentwide security efforts got a vote of approval last week in the House Appropriations Committee's report on fiscal 2002 funding, the panel's decision to provide less money than the Bush administration has asked for may stymie plans to expand the program.

The General Services Administration houses the Federal Computer Incident Response Center (FedCIRC), the central warning and response group for civilian agencies. Pending approval by the full House, the committee plans to give FedCIRC $2 million more next year, bringing its budget up to almost $10 million.

But that is $1 million less than the administration wants, even though "the committee is supportive of the decentralized, distributed philosophy for computer incident detection and response that is inherent in the current federal effort and that appears to allow appropriate agency control and private sector involvement," the report states.

FedCIRC is encouraging agencies to use the managed security services offered through the GSA Safeguard security contract to pick complete intrusion-detection solutions that agencies can use to report incidents to FedCIRC.

The new money would go toward an analysis center that FedCIRC plans to create, said Sallie McDonald, assistant commissioner for information assurance and critical infrastructure protection at GSA's Federal Technology Service.

The center would allow FedCIRC to analyze individual incidents across government that, when combined, may reveal a larger coordinated attack. But if FedCIRC does not get the full amount it requested for the center in 2002, "that will cripple our ability to put the center in place," McDonald said.

Featured

  • Federal 100 Awards
    Federal 100 logo

    Fed 100 nominations are now open

    Help us identify this year's outstanding individuals in federal IT.

  • Defense
    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) reveal concept renderings for the Next NGA West (N2W) campus from the design-build team McCarthy HITT winning proposal. The entirety of the campus is anticipated to be operational in 2025.

    How NGA is tackling interoperability challenges

    Mark Munsell, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency’s CTO, talks about talent shortages and how the agency is working to get more unclassified data.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.