Jacada server provides one interface

A new tool from Jacada Ltd. promises to help federal agencies modernize their information technology systems by providing a common interface for newly developed applications and still-useful legacy systems.

By providing a common user interface layer, the Jacada Interface Server enables developers to generate a consistent look and feel for new and existing applications, company officials said.

"Agencies can modernize and Web- enable legacy systems without having to touch the code," said David Holmes, senior vice president of marketing for the Atlanta-based company. "What we're doing is separating the presentation layer from the business logic layer."

As interface standards evolve, IT shops must spend time and money adapting to each new technology, Holmes said.

"Agencies are full of Cobol developers that build mainframe applications, and now they can build applications without [learning] new skills," he said. "You don't have to retrain them as Java developers." The Jacada Interface Server will be available in September with support for Extensible Markup Language transactions. Support for new applications written in Java, Cobol and Report Program Generator is being tested and will ship later this year, officials said. Support for applications using new development architectures, including Microsoft Corp.'s .Net and Sun Microsystems Inc.'s Java 2 Platform Enterprise Edition, will be available in 2002.

The Jacada Interface Server's cost is based on individual configurations and starts at $4,500 per Interface Developer Kit and $30,000 per server for deployment. Adjusted General Services Administration schedule pricing will be available soon, Holmes said.

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