Letter to the Editor

The government information technology workforce is getting tired of being "slammed."

With reference to "Daniels: Fed IT workers "not the best'" (Federal Computer Week, July 30, 2001) and comments by Rep. Tom Davis (R-Va.) in "Technical employees to be pilots for civil service changes" (Federal News Service, July 20, 2001): Do those who make these comments not realize the budget restraints, lack of training and reduced workforce conditions we work under? Where do they come up with the stats to support these comments?

Someone should take the time to survey us to get the real facts. This would allow people like Office of Management and Budget Director Mitchell Daniels Jr. and Rep. Tom Davis to obtain an accurate view of the current government IT workforce, and that should eliminate comments like federal IT workers "are probably not the best the nation has to offer."

Also, Davis' suggestion to create "short-term appointments, from two to five years, for critical technology or procurement positions" is definitely not the way to build a "dedicated" government IT workforce.

The key to building a better government IT workforce in today's fast-paced IT world is to work with those of us who are here for the duration and who "DO the WORK." Provide funds for training, don't attempt to contract us out, match our civilian counterparts salaries, and then leave us alone.

Name withheld by request

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