Fedwire

NIMA has new director

James Clapper Jr. will take over as director of the National Imagery and Mapping Agency, the first civilian to hold the position. He replaces Army Lt. Gen. James King, who retires later this year.

As a lieutenant general in the Air Force, Clapper was director of the Defense Intelligence Agency. His most recent job since retiring from the military has been as vice president and director of intelligence programs at SRA International Inc.

NIMA provides the Defense Department and intelligence agencies with images, image intelligence and geospatial information to support national security.

Defense CIO starts work

John Stenbit was sworn in Aug. 7 as the Defense Department's chief information officer.

Stenbit, a former executive with TRW Inc., will also be assistant secretary of Defense for command, control, communications and intelligence. He replaces Art Money, who left that post in April.

Stenbit was executive vice president for special assignments at TRW's Aerospace and Information Systems unit before retiring in May 2001. As assistant secretary, he will act as adviser to the Defense secretary on information su.periority and intelligence policy issues.

ATF extends seat management

The Treasury Department's Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms announced Aug. 6 that it has awarded a blanket purchase agreement that extends its seat management services with Unisys Corp.

The 6,000 ATF seats covered by the deal make it one of the larger seat management projects in federal government. Unisys received its first deal with ATF in 1997, and the new pact continues its presence at the agency until 2004, according to Unisys officials. The contract is valued at up to $60 million.

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