NASA appoints security chief

NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin has named a director to head up the agency's Office of Security Management and Safeguards, created in November 2000 to oversee NASA's physical security and portions of its information technology security.

Goldin appointed David Saleeba, a 26-year veteran of the U.S. Secret Service, to the position. Most recently special agent in charge and chief of the Secret Service headquarters Intelligence Division, Saleeba will oversee security for classified systems and information at NASA.

"Safety and security are priority issues for NASA," Goldin said. "Saleeba's extensive experience will be an important asset to this agency."

NASA created the Office of Security Management and Safeguards to serve as the single point of focus for security matters at the agency, including physical protection of employees, visitors and property, and protection of information. The director of the office reports directly to the NASA administrator.

A NASA source said the office is responsible for guarding the agency's classified networks and data, and the chief information officer's office handles all nonclassified systems. Because there are few classified systems at NASA, most security responsibilities rest with the CIO's office, according to the source.

However, the two offices share the same floor at NASA headquarters in Washington, D.C., and personnel in both meet often and collaborate on some projects, the source said.

NASA's associate administrator for external relations, John Schumacher,has served as acting director of the office.

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