NASA appoints security chief

NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin has named a director to head the agency's Office of Security Management and Safeguards, created in November 2000 to oversee NASA's physical security and portions of its information technology security.

Goldin appointed David Saleeba, a 26-year veteran of the U.S. Secret Service, to the position. Saleeba was most recently special agent in charge and chief of the Secret Service's Intelligence Division. He will now oversee security for classified systems and information at NASA.

"Safety and security are priority issues for NASA," Goldin said. "Saleeba's extensive experience will be an important asset to this agency."

NASA officials created the Office of Security Management and Safeguards to be the single point of focus for security matters, including physical protection of employees, visitors and property, and protection of information. The office director reports to the NASA administrator.

A NASA source said that the office is responsible for guarding the agency's classified networks and data; the chief information officer's office handles all nonclassified systems. Because there are few classified systems at NASA, most security responsibilities rest with the CIO's office, according to the source.

However, the two offices share the same floor at NASA headquarters in Washington, D.C., and personnel in both meet often and collaborate on some projects, the source said. NASA's associate administrator for external relations, John Schumacher, has served as acting director of the office.

Featured

  • FCW Perspectives
    human machine interface

    Your agency isn’t ready for AI

    To truly take advantage, government must retool both its data and its infrastructure.

  • Cybersecurity
    secure network (bluebay/Shutterstock.com)

    Federal CISO floats potential for new supply chain regs

    The federal government's top IT security chief and canvassed industry for feedback on how to shape new rules of the road for federal acquisition and procurement.

  • People
    DHS Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, shown here at her Nov. 8, 2017, confirmation hearing. DHS Photo by Jetta Disco

    DHS chief Nielsen resigns

    Kirstjen Nielsen, the first Homeland Security secretary with a background in cybersecurity, is being replaced on an acting basis by the Customs and Border Protection chief. Her last day is April 10.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.