VA eyes vendors for IT follow-on

PCHS-2 RFP

The Department of Veterans Affairs' new chief information officer, John Gauss, has approved a request for proposals for a follow-on contract for hardware and software worth up to $1.37 billion.

The VA seeks at least two vendors for PCHS-2 Procurement of Computer Hardware and Software-2 and requires at least 40 percent of the subcontracts to be awarded to minority-, woman- or veteran-owned businesses.

The RFP calls for a one-year base contract with four one-year options. Proposals are due Sept. 24 to replace the VA's PCHS-1 contract that ends next January.

"We need to have a contract that allows us to buy commodity hardware and software," Gauss said. "We want PCHS-2 to be a commodities product, standard space and interchangeable."

In addition, the new contract will include leasing provisions that did not exist in PCHS-1, Gauss said.

The contract will include information technology solutions, networks, security, health care automation and paperless office products. It also calls for handheld computers and a portable system that's powerful enough to perform as a desktop PC replacement.

In its fourth year as a governmentwide acquisition contract (GWAC), PCHS-1 has been a popular contracting option for providing personal computer hardware and software at competitive prices. Total sales have exceeded $631 million.

Gauss said there was no plan to turn PCHS-2 into a GWAC, but other government agencies will be allowed to buy off the contract.

Featured

  • Workforce
    White House rainbow light shutterstock ID : 1130423963 By zhephotography

    White House rolls out DEIA strategy

    On Tuesday, the Biden administration issued agencies a roadmap to guide their efforts to develop strategic plans for diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility (DEIA), as required under a as required under a June executive order.

  • Defense
    software (whiteMocca/Shutterstock.com)

    Why DOD is so bad at buying software

    The Defense Department wants to acquire emerging technology faster and more efficiently. But will its latest attempts to streamline its processes be enough?

Stay Connected