Letter to the editor

In response to "Daniels: Fed IT workers 'not the best': It seems that several factors could be at work here lack of training dollars, lack of true compensation at the free-market level, lack of trust from management or executive staff, and a dislike of paperwork.

I think the first two items may have been covered enough. The third, however, offers an interesting point of view. Managers may believe that if staff members have the opportunity to attend a course to beef up their information technology skills, the staff person will leave. After all, most training organizations offer some type of promise that the individual will pass the third-party certification exam for Cisco Systems Inc., Microsoft Corp. or Oracle Corp. Most managers may know enough to understand that in the money game, certified earns more than uncertified. Therefore, the staff person will go away to chase more money.

However, studies show that in many cases, employees will stay given the opportunity to grow professionally, even if higher pay is offered elsewhere. It might also help if managers seek out training organizations that have a skills orientation rather than a certification-only orientation. A skills orientation would mean that the courses focus on how the training applies to a workplace setting.

The paperwork issue in training can become a nightmare, especially if there is a form for the training involved, a form for the travel, a form for hotel, a form for meal reimbursements too many forms to handle.

In our organization, we provide everything: the learning opportunity, housing, meals, rides to and from the airport, recreation facilities, local transportation. If we only owned an airline.

Dalton Young

National Center for Employee Development

U.S. Postal Service

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