Spacecom on alert for cyberattacks

U.S. Space Command has not yet detected any increase in cyberattacks either in conjunction with or following today's terrorist attacks on major U.S. targets, including the Pentagon and the World Trade Center.

The theory within information warfare circles in recent years has been that a massive terrorist or state attack of this magnitude could be preceded by, conducted in concert with or followed by massive cyberattacks on the nation's critical infrastructure. Those cyberattacks—especially if conducted prior to a physical attack—could theoretically disrupt banking and finance activities, military command and control, and traffic control.

U.S. Space Command, the organization ultimately responsible for conducting cyberwarfare and nuclear warfare, is at maximum alert like the rest of the Defense Department, but networks so far are not under a coordinated attack.

"We are doing the same things we do every day. We certainly are casting a more critical eye toward monitoring our networks," said Army Maj. Barry Venable, Space Command spokesman. "It's all very early, but so far we're seeing no increased activity on our networks."

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