DOE tech aids relief efforts

The Energy Department is working with other agencies to support the rescue efforts at the World Trade Center by contributing information technology equipment and expertise, as well as emergency medical technicians and other assistance.

Along with Federal Emergency Management Agency staff members, DOE employees assisted in the search for survivors by using ground-penetrating radar equipment adapted with motion-detection applications.

Other DOE teams used remotely operated equipment—including infrared cameras, robotic equipment and fiber-optic cameras—to aid in the search for victims and evidence. The equipment enables rescue personnel to see into spaces that are too small or dangerous for humans to enter, and can also transport and manipulate tools in those small or hazardous spaces.

DOE personnel are also helping the FBI reconstruct the photo identification system used at the World Trade Center.

"Department of Energy personnel, like so many others throughout the nation, wanted to offer whatever help they could to try to ease the suffering in New York," Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham said in a release.

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