Governor delivers Va. tech guide

e-Communities Task Force home page

With his term ending in about three months, Virginia Gov. Jim Gilmore announced several new technology initiatives.

He unveiled a long-awaited guidebook to help encourage communities to develop a Web presence, and he announced plans to provide a single secure identification number for residents to conduct transactions via state, local and education Web sites. He also previewed a fourth iteration of the commonwealth's Web portal.

The governor's announcements were delivered via a video broadcast to the third annual Commonwealth of Virginia Information Technology Symposium (www.covits.com), hosted Sept. 25-26 at the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, Va. The event also was broadcast live via the Internet.

Gilmore's e-Communities Task Force, formed more than a year ago, presented its Leadership Guidebook for communities looking to create participatory Web sites. "The Internet is not just a global tool, but a local tool as well," Gilmore said. "In Virginia, we want to bring those who are closest to us even closer."

Another initiative, expected to be operational by December, is MyVirginia PIN (http://www.myvirginiapin.org/info). State residents will be able to obtain a single, confidential personal identification number to access electronic state and local government and education services. Officials demonstrated how citizens will apply for a PIN online and then receive a number via postal mail.

According to state officials, a single PIN is convenient for users accessing services, and it benefits government because operating costs will diminish as more users access online services.

The state also unveiled a revamped portal at www.myvirginia.org. When a user types in a local ZIP code, a database retrieves services and resources that might be of interest based on geographic location. Officials said the database is still under development.

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