Letter to the editor

I read with great interest the article "Battle lines form over red-light cameras" in the September issue of Government E-Business.

We worked with the Texas legislature to change the laws this session to allow the cameras in Texas, but we were not successful this time. Red-light cameras are a cost-effective way to prevent collisions, save lives, reduce injuries, save money and increase voluntary compliance, which are all goals of an effective traffic safety program in a community. Now, some people want to cite privacy concerns. What privacy is being violated when an OFFENDER is photographed on a public street? If you don't want to be photographed, don't run the light!

Another criticism for the camera systems was that they cause an increase in rear-end collisions. The real reason for a rear-end collision is failure of the following driver to control his speed, and following too closely.

Busy intersections are difficult areas in which to enforce the law regarding red lights. Many times, an officer in a car or on a motorcycle attempting to enforce the law creates a greater danger to the public than the harm he is seeking to prevent. There are some other issues raised in the article that require thought, but the systems are beneficial and seem to have public support. The thorny issues can be worked out, and it is time to do that.

James Nowak Lufkin, Texas, Police Department

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