Letter to the editor

I understand the value of posting announcements and, as in the case of the Sept. 11 attacks, emergency information to federal Web sites. This is obviously in the public's best interest. ["Keep the public posted," FCW editorial, Oct. 1.]

However, there is a limit on what should be posted. There are numerous federal Web sites, especially military, that contain information that is not suitable for public viewing. In light of recent events, this becomes even more important.

As a citizen, I want to know everything I can about our military mission and the role that each military installation plays. But I don't want the world to know. This information may seem harmless, but it can be used to develop another attack against us.

Our military leaders should take action to ensure that all Web sites are checked for "sensitive" information. And if there is a question as to whether to remove it, use my philosophy: "When in doubt, leave it out."

I'm sure the American citizens will appreciate this extra step to ensure our safety.

Chris Blumberg
Alexandria, Va.

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