XML need not stand for expensive

Native XML databases may be a new breed, but already there is no shortage of products to choose from.

Among the commercial products are Software AG's Tamino XML Database, which starts at $40,000 per CPU, and Ipedo Inc.'s Ipedo XML Database, which starts at $50,000 for the Linux and Microsoft Corp. Windows versions and $90,000 for the Sun Microsystems Inc. Solaris version. If these prices seem steep, you can check out one of the offerings available from the open-source community.

For example, dbXML Core, from the dbXML Group LLC, is a fine native XML storage solution. Likewise, the eXist XML database is another good option. Those solutions offer the same functionality as their commercial counterparts but may or may not come with technical support.

By evaluating both commercial and open-source XML database offerings, you will get the best insight into your agency's options for implementing an XML strategy that will integrate well with your existing applications.

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