Call for nominations

This week, Federal Computer Week begins to accept nominations for the next Federal 100 awards — the 13th year the magazine has done so.

The programs and ideas that government and industry executive winners work on may have changed a lot during the past decade-plus, but the under.lying reasons for that work has not. Potential winners are those who made a significant contribution — either because of dedication, inspirational ideas or risk taking — to the federal information technology market.

Remember, what counts is what people did, not the positions they occupied. And winners are part of an all-star team, not a hall of fame. The awards are not a popularity contest but rather are given to those who have had a significant impact on the federal IT community. As always, the panel of judges FCW assembles each winter looks for those government and industry executives who displayed extraordinary effort and commitment in the year past, in this case 2001. Indeed, one reason the award is such an honor is because it is bestowed by the winners' colleagues. The choices are difficult, and each year the judges have a difficult time narrowing the number to 100.

We depend on FCW's 86,000 readers to nominate people who work nationwide — not just those who live and work in the Washington, D.C., area or in agency or corporate federal headquarters. These are individuals who do not appear regularly in FCW, but have shown imagination, courage, diligence or creative financing to develop innovative programs or make existing programs work better.

So, as we have done so many times in the past, we invite FCW readers to log on to www.fcw.com and click on the Federal 100 logo. Keep in mind the major changes that occurred this year and the individuals responsible for making them happen. Who championed pioneering ways to buy and manage systems? Who developed innovative systems or created budgeting miracles? These are the people FCW wants to recognize.

The nominations deadline is Jan. 4, 2002. So, please nominate early.

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