Rethinking government

Rethinking government

Agencies shuffle budgets and priorities to achieve goals of the post-Sept. 11 era

In many ways, the new millennium really began on Sept. 11 because that’s when everything changed.

The terrorist attacks and the U.S. response to them have profoundly altered the government’s thinking. Certainly, security has gained prominence, with the president’s cybersecurity adviser Richard Clarke, right, leading efforts to protect systems.
But nearly every aspect of government operations has been affected.

A special report, part of GCN’s ongoing coverage this year, begins on Page 6. It focuses on two aspects of post-Sept. 11 government: the quest for new technologies and the altering of budget priorities. The report also features the voices of several government employees who tell how the attacks have changed their lives.

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