Transportation security chief appointed

Security screener jobs

President Bush on Jan. 7 used a recess appointment to install former Secret Service chief John Magaw as undersecretary of Transportation for security.

Magaw will head the Transportation Security Administration, chartered by Congress to improve aviation security in the wake of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

The Aviation and Transportation Security Act, which created the agency, mandates Magaw take control of airline security no later than Feb. 17, according to Paul Takemoto, agency spokesman.

Other requirements Magaw faces in his new post include ensuring that the screening of all checked bags for explosives begins Jan. 18 and that an explosives detection system is in place by the end of the year.

He also is responsible for hiring about 31,000 security screeners, Takemoto said.

The Transportation Department has employed Korn/Ferry International to assist with recruiting federal security directors for the nation's 81 largest airports, according to a jointly operated Web site, www.dot-tsa.gov.

Magaw comes to the Transportation Security Administration from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, where he was acting director of the Office of National Preparedness — a position turned over to Bruce Baughman. Before joining FEMA, Magaw was director of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.

During his tenure at the Secret Service, which began in 1967, Magaw rose in the ranks to become director in 1992.

"The skills he has developed over the course of his stellar career will prove instrumental as he goes about the job of rebuilding public trust and confidence in our transportation systems," Transportation Secretary Norman Mineta said at Magaw's Senate confirmation hearing Dec. 20. The Senate did not confirm him before adjourning, leading to the recess appointment. Bush had nominated Magaw Dec. 13.

Featured

  • Defense
    Soldiers from the Old Guard test the second iteration of the Integrated Visual Augmentation System (IVAS) capability set during an exercise at Fort Belvoir, VA in Fall 2019. Photo by Courtney Bacon

    IVAS and the future of defense acquisition

    The Army’s Integrated Visual Augmentation System has been in the works for years, but the potentially multibillion deal could mark a paradigm shift in how the Defense Department buys and leverages technology.

  • Cybersecurity
    Deputy Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas  (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lora Ratliff)

    Mayorkas announces cyber 'sprints' on ransomware, ICS, workforce

    The Homeland Security secretary announced a series of focused efforts to address issues around ransomware, critical infrastructure and the agency's workforce that will all be launched in the coming weeks.

Stay Connected