GAO says GSA Advantage, ITSS lack management controls

GAO says GSA Advantage, ITSS lack management controls

Two General Services Administration online procurement systems lack basic management controls, according to correspondence from the General Accounting Office to GSA that was released earlier this week.

The letter was sent to GSA administrator Stephen A. Perry and cites serious shortcomings in the data.

GAO examined GSA Advantage and the Information Technology Solutions Shop and found no system documentation, which normally includes data processing, application coding and operating instructions, and poor data entry controls.

Auditors found $32.2 million in simulated orders to train users on GSA Advantage that were made to test the system but were included in GSA Advantage’s final numbers. Auditors also discovered inflated sales numbers for ITSS because an incorrect formula was used to calculate total sales.

GAO recommended that GSA:
  • Fully document both procurement systems
  • Set up procedures for documenting future changes
  • Establish procedures to prevent test data from entering production systems
  • Develop procedures for periodic examination, validation and timely correction of data.
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