Letter to the editor

The "cheap shot" letter left out the very point of the "cheap seat" letter!

The Feb. 13 letter to the editor ["Where are NMCI cheap seats?"] pointed out that the very "cheapest seat" NMCI seat was over the $2,000 mark!

Quote: "Even the thin client seat — the cheapest seat — is $2,335.92 a year, and that is a basic seat with no options."

In the Feb. 26 letter [Why the cheap shots at NMCI?], it was taken out of context and rewritten! Thanks to FCW for providing link to Feb. 13 letter and getting the actual text!

Yes, please go to the EDS Web site and find the average cost of an NMCI seat. You will see it is actually higher than the $4,000 mark!

For example, look at contract line item number 0004AA — full-service embarkable portable — a notebook computer that will be used by the majority of Navy people who travel and must have computer access. The cost is a staggering $4,509.96! That is a basic Dell Computer Corp. notebook with an out-of-date processor, too!

Once again, the Navy is paying way too much for NMCI.

Name withheld by request

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