Bush seeks boost in security budget

Supplemental Appropriations request

The White House March 21 submitted to Congress an emergency supplemental request for fiscal 2002 that includes more than $36 million for various homeland security information technology programs.

The proposed supplemental would add new money to some existing programs, and would provide start-up funding for programs outlined in the Bush administration's fiscal 2003 budget request, submitted to Congress in February.

To be included in the emergency funding each program had to address a true emergency, be an immediate and known requirement, and could not be met with existing agency funds, according to the release from the Office of Management and Budget.

IT programs included in the supplemental are:

*$2.5 million to the General Services Administration for an Internet Vulnerability Program Management Office to protect against potential disruptions in the IT infrastructure.

*$5.8 million to the Justice Department for deployment of the Automated Biometrics Identification System/Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (IAFIS) at 30 additional ports of entry.

*$19.3 million to the National Science Foundation to provide additional funds for the Cybercorps/Scholarships for Service security education and recruitment program.

*$9 million to the Commerce Department to begin the Homeland Security IT and Evaluation Program.

This money is on top of the more than $722 million requested for IT homeland security initiatives in the fiscal 2003 budget.

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