FTS offers strategy for future

Federal Technology Service

The General Services Administration Federal Technology Service's proposed strategy for the future is focused in equal parts on meeting specific needs — such as security — and changing how agencies use FTS' services.

FTS unveiled the first ideas for the strategy April 16 at its Network Services Conference in Orlando. Officials also invited comment from agency employees on how important each proposed idea would be to the agencies.

This will be an important part of FTS' discussions as the strategy is finalized during the coming months, said John Johnson, associate administrator for service delivery at the agency.

FTS serves agencies in several ways, such as awarding and managing some of the government's largest information technology and telecommunications contracts, and helping agencies use those contracts and other vehicles available throughout government.

The five ideas in the agency's strategy affect every portion of FTS and include:

* Making all of FTS' offerings available through an e-marketplace.

* Emphasizing information security in all of the FTS contracts and helping agencies determine their security needs through four levels (or profiles) of offerings.

* Offering integrated solutions by bringing together the IT and telecommunications contracts, making the contracts transparent and focusing on an integrated solution.

* Awarding contracts based on best value, and not placing emphasis on lowest price.

* Minimizing the effect of transition, particularly in the telecommunications area.

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