Letter to the editor

I am a former special agent of the FBI. The problem with a national identification card is this: Who cares who the person is? We want to know what they are likely to do!

No ID card can tell you what they are likely to do. Only useful intelligence can tell you what a person is likely to do. Useful intelligence comes from the people who are related to or in contact with the person in question.

We have the means (statutory, regulatory and technologically) to interview most of the people in contact with those who wish to hijack our aircraft or suicide bomb our stores and restaurants.

Interviews are how law enforcement and intelligence professionals gather useful intelligence.

Why don't we use our technology to increase the professionals' ability to gather useful intelligence as opposed to potentially suppressing our precious civil rights.

The Constitution is not a suicide pact and it can guide us to meet this threat without giving up our freedom.

John Donovan USAVisitor.net Alexandria, Va.

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