Letter to the editor

I would like to add some extra insight from the perspective of a Navy Marine Corps Intranet subcontract employee at an assumption of responsibility (AOR) site.

I am one of the people the user comes in contact with for support issues in the "as-is" environment. I have found the government employees nothing short of hostile and belligerent toward NMCI personnel to the point where there is absolutely no question in my mind that they are attempting (and having some success) to sabotage NMCI.

What these people don't seem to understand is that I write to newspapers, magazines and elected officials. Fortunately, there is always base realignment and closure.

One of the reasons why NMCI's progress has been somewhat inauspicious is because of the management style of EDS managers. The subcontractors are not treated in a manner that inspires and rewards our contributions.

Without us, NMCI would not exist. Based on what I have seen of the direction, or the lack of, EDS management provides to this project, I am amazed that the Navy has the confidence to allow the contract to continue.

Mike Deering

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