Team recruits for tech careers

The Defense Information Systems Agency and the National Science Center are combining their resources to try to attract young people to math, science and technology careers.

The federal government and the nation in general are faced with a shortage of personnel in high-tech fields, and DISA and the NSC signed a memorandum of understanding July 30 to help introduce students to technical careers before they enter college, said Maj. Gen. James Bryan, DISA's vice director.

The NSC (, a partnership between a nonprofit organization, the National Science Center Inc., and the U.S. Army encourages an interest in math and science careers among youth. DISA, responsible for the command, control, communications and information systems of the Defense Department, will work to include a greater focus on information technology within the NSC.

Research shows that "if you're going to capture the minds and energies of American youth today in math, science, engineering and computers, you have to do it in middle school," Bryan said, adding that it is much more difficult to get them interested later on.

The NSC headquarters, "Fort Discovery" in Augusta, Ga., is a family-oriented math and science center with nearly 300 interactive exhibits and is also the base for several national educational outreach programs. It already houses a computer lab, a science store and other features, including an indoor lightning storm.

DISA intends not only to become involved in the center's existing programs but also help establish new programs and initiatives with an information technology perspective, including "a technology-oriented camp for the kids," where students could learn such things as how to build a Web site or create a robot, said Shannon Teates, a DISA employee helping to support the partnership.


  • Congress
    U.S. Capitol (Photo by M DOGAN / Shutterstock)

    Funding bill clears Congress, heads for president's desk

    The $1.3 trillion spending package passed the House of Representatives on March 22 and the Senate in the early hours of March 23. President Trump is expected to sign the bill, securing government funding for the remainder of fiscal year 2018.

  • 2018 Fed 100

    The 2018 Federal 100

    This year's Fed 100 winners show just how much committed and talented individuals can accomplish in federal IT. Read their profiles to learn more!

  • Census
    How tech can save money for 2020 census

    Trump campaign taps census question as a fund-raising tool

    A fundraising email for the Trump-Pence reelection campaign is trying to get supporters behind a controversial change to the census -- asking respondents whether or not they are U.S. citizens.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.