FBI continues tech exec shift

FBI announcement

The changing of the guard at the FBI goes on.

The latest shuffle has produced a new director for investigative technologies and a chief for the Cyber Crime Section.

These appointments -- and a half dozen others announced Aug. 13 — are the latest in a housecleaning that has led to new bosses in posts ranging from chief of records management to chief information officer.

Thomas Richardson has been named assistant director in charge of the Investigative Technologies Division.

An FBI agent for 27 years, Richardson moves to the technology post from serving as acting deputy assistant director of the Criminal Investigative Division's Financial Crimes, Integrity in Government/Civil Rights, Operational Support and Administrative Branch.

During his career, Richardson also has served as chief of a Middle East terrorism unit, agent in charge of the Omaha Division and as an agent in Washington, D.C., Chicago and Omaha.

Keith Lourdeau has been named chief of the Cyber Crime Section, part of a new Cyber Division created this year to improve the FBI's ability to investigate Internet and computer system crimes.

Lourdeau has worked for the FBI for 16 years. His most recent assignment was to work with the CIA to establish greater cooperation between it and the FBI in targeting international organized crime groups, according to the FBI.

Mueller also announced the retirement of Dale Watson, the FBI's senior counter-terrorism official. Watson, whose title is executive assistant director, served in counter-terrorism and counter-intelligence posts for 20 years.

The appointments and retirement are the latest in a long string of ousters and appointments since Mueller took over as FBI director a year ago amid calls for sweeping bureau reform.

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