Gore talks tech, re-invention

Innovative Government Forum

Myth has it that Al Gore once claimed he invented the Internet. But regardless of whether he was its architect, the former vice president was back, talking about technology's evolution and critical role in government at a conference in Sacramento, Calif., Aug. 26.

Gore gave a keynote speech — which was closed to the press — at the Innovative Government Forum for federal, state and local technology and government officials.

"Al Gore started out with some jokes, obviously about the 2000 election and some of his time as vice president," said Bob Mulholland, campaign adviser to the California Democratic Party, who attended the speech. "But it really was about technology and how it rapidly is changing. And he made references to America, 100, 150 years ago about the Pony Express and that stuff and how it would take months to get information. Now of course that stuff happens instantaneously."

Chuck Hansen, president and chief executive officer of the company that sponsored the event — Hansen Information Technologies — said Gore, who had been vacationing with his family in Puget Sound before coming to Sacramento, appeared "warm" and "relaxed" and was "self-deprecating."

Gore didn't give any hint whether he was running for president in 2004, Hansen said, adding that Gore was in his element.

"This was an area he was born into," Hansen said. "He knows this landscape very well. He's been associated with the Internet for a long time. In fact some of his humor was about the Internet and re-inventing government, trying to make government more efficient and even some of the issues with homeland security too."

Gore's speaking contract prohibited attendance by news media — "very routine" arrangement, Hansen said, adding that his company was also asked not to disclose the speaking fee. Gore himself is a former journalist.

Featured

  • Defense
    Ryan D. McCarthy being sworn in as Army Secretary Oct. 10, 2019. (Photo credit: Sgt. Dana Clarke/U.S. Army)

    Army wants to spend nearly $1B on cloud, data by 2025

    Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said lack of funding or a potential delay in the JEDI cloud bid "strikes to the heart of our concern."

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.