USB Universal Card Reader: Card consolidation

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"Gadgets on the go"

Computer memory used to be something that most users never saw. It came inside a machine and that was that. But the packaging of memory has changed a lot in recent years. As smaller, mobile computing devices have proliferated, so has the need for extra, portable memory.

Portable memory comes in a handful of formats, each compatible with its own set of devices, including digital cameras and camcorders. So what's a computer user to do when working with one PC as a "home base" while juggling several devices that use different types of storage?

Consider Memorex Products Inc.'s USB Universal Card Reader. You can use the Memorex card reader to easily transfer data from other devices to your desktop PC or notebook, and vice versa. The device can read CompactFlash cards, SmartMedia cards, SD/MMC cards, Memory Sticks from Sony Electronics e-Solutions Co. LLC and Microdrives from IBM Corp.

The reader has two slots, each of which is treated as its own drive.

File transfer is seamless, and access to data is instantaneous. Setup requires installation of a software driver and a reboot, but the process is fast and easy.

If you use more than one type of memory card and routinely transfer data to and from a PC or notebook, consider the USB Universal Card Reader. The convenience of using one reader for five types of cards can't be beat.

The device is available for $60 directly from Memorex at www.eMemorex.com or call (562) 906-2800.

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