Army gives C4ISR a promotion

Command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C4ISR) has long been considered a key component of the Army's ongoing transformation, and now that area has been given its own line in the service's transformation campaign plan.

Lt. Gen. Peter Cuviello, the Army's chief information officer, said that he, along with Lt. Gen Robert Noonan, the Army's deputy chief of staff for intelligence, last week convinced the service's vice chief of staff to give C4ISR its own line of operations in the plan.

"It was always being looked at, but sort of in the second or third tier," like how C4ISR factored into other key areas, instead of on its own, Cuviello said following a panel today at the Homeland Security and National Defense Symposium in Atlantic City, N.J. "Army leaders want to know direct impacts."

Cuviello said giving C4ISR its own line of operations on the transformation campaign plan will give the Army's leadership a better look at the condition of C4ISR on its own and how it impacts the service's overall transformation.

"Instead of being part of the other talks, we can talk [about C4ISR] as a holistic entity," he said.

The symposium sponsors are the Army's Communications-Electronics Command (Cecom), the Association of the U.S. Army's Fort Monmouth, N.J., chapter, the Association of Old Crows' Garden State chapter, and the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association's Fort Monmouth chapter.

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