Letter to the editor

With all the impetus toward security, something that seems to be overlooked is the information available off government Web sites through "electronic phone books."

Many of these, especially in our agency, list things such as cell phones, pagers, secretaries, etc. Obviously, if someone can access this information through the Web, they have e-mail.

Simply listing the person's name, phone number and e-mail address is sufficient for legitimate public access. Why potentially increase danger (or harassment) by listing or advertising people's cell phone numbers, etc.? Does some bigwig really want his secretary out of the way so bad he wants to advertise who it is?

A few months ago (as an example exercise), someone in our agency looked up somebody else's work address, then they were able to find their home address, and then plotted a map of the person's route from home to work and back. If there are nefarious people out there, why make their attempts easier?

Name withheld by request

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