Cyber bill gets boost

The Senate passed a bill Oct. 16 that will provide more than $900 million over five years for cybersecurity research and development.

The full Senate passed the Cyber Security Research and Development Act (S. 2182), which authorizes funding for new research and grants programs through the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the National Science Foundation.

Those programs will address matters ranging from basic research into security infrastructures to scholarships for new cybersecurity experts.

"In the long run, all government and private-sector cybersecurity efforts depend on people — trained experts with the knowledge and skills to develop innovative solutions and respond creatively and proactively to evolving threats," said Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), sponsor of the Senate bill, during debate on the bill.

The bill's supporters made it clear that they believe the programs it creates cannot afford to wait.

"The stakes are high, and you can bet that hackers and cyberterrorists won't stand still, so it is important to launch these new cybersecurity research programs as soon as possible," said Sen. John Edwards (D-N.C.).

Rep. Sherwood Boehlert (R-N.Y.), co-sponsor of the House version of the bill (H.R. 3394), and industry representatives, who often expressed concerns about potential standards for security technology, applauded the Senate's action.

The House must approve minor differences between the Senate and House versions of the bill, which will then be sent to President Bush to sign.

The Senate version includes making the bill's language compatible with the Homeland Security Act and creating a program to train faculty to teach college-level cybersecurity courses.

Featured

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

  • Comment
    Pilot Class. The author and Barbie Flowers are first row third and second from right, respectively.

    How VA is disrupting tech delivery

    A former Digital Service specialist at the Department of Veterans Affairs explains efforts to transition government from a legacy "project" approach to a more user-centered "product" method.

  • Cloud
    cloud migration

    DHS cloud push comes with complications

    A pressing data center closure schedule and an ensuing scramble to move applications means that some Homeland Security components might need more than one hop to get to the cloud.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.