Adesta continues Army Corps work

Army Corps of Engineers sites worldwide will continue to have their electronic systems protected by systems integrator Adesta LLC, with the recent award of more than $6 million in new task orders.

Adesta will be installing, upgrading, surveying and maintaining electronic security systems at various locations, supporting a range of tools and services, including:

* Intrusion-detection systems.

* Closed circuit TV systems.

* Electronic entry control systems.

* Physical security.

* Counter-terrorism measures.

The Army Corps of Engineers' Engineering and Support Center in Huntsville, Ala., awarded the contracts last year, and the task orders are in various stages of completion, said Roddy Traxler, director of security at Adesta.

"Some we have mobilized on the site, some are in the design phase, some are nearing completion," Traxler said. "The tasks are scheduled to be completed over the next six months, but could be extended due to changes in scope and various other factors."

In addition to sites in Arkansas, California, Minnesota, North Carolina, Virginia, Washington state and Washington, D.C., the Omaha, Neb.-based company also will continue work at Army Corps sites in Japan and Germany. Traxler said Adesta would not identify the exact locations of the work because of its sensitive nature.

Adesta has been a prime electronic security systems contractor for the Army Corps of Engineers Installation Support Center of Expertise since 1991. End users serviced during that time include the Army, the National Guard Bureau, the Defense Logistics Agency, the FBI, and the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City.

The latest $6 million in task orders were awarded in August and September, according to company officials.

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