Management scorecard uptick expected

Results.gov agenda updates

Office of Management and Budget officials are predicting a bit more improvement in agencies' scores on the president's management scorecard, which will be updated next month when the fiscal 2004 budget is released.

The Bush administration released the first scorecards last February with the president's fiscal 2003 budget, and it released an update on agencies' status with the mid-year review in July.

The scorecard provides a red-yellow-green gauge of where each agency stands on the five items in the President's Management Agenda: strategic workforce management, expanded use of e-government, increased competitive bidding of government services, improved financial performance and linking performance to budgets.

In the first scorecard, more than 85 percent of the scores were red. The update held many green and yellow scores, meaning that agencies were making progress, but observers should not expect to see any dramatic status improvement on the scorecard to be released with the fiscal 2004 budget, said Robert Shea, a counselor to Mark Everson, OMB's deputy director for management.

It will take time for agencies to find and fix all of the management problems in every area, but OMB officials have seen agencies taking concrete steps forward at each quarterly update, Shea said.

"The scorecard is working," he said.

Updates on the scorecard and the management agenda are available on the White House's Results.gov Web site (www.results.gov/agenda/index.html).

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