AT&T to wire Capitol Hill buildings

AT&T Government Solutions is working on a project to connect 14 government buildings on Capitol Hill to its local fiber network.

The move is part of AT&T's strategy to compete for phone, data, video and broadband business with Congress, the General Accounting Office and other Washington, D.C., locations.

Chris Rooney, president of AT&T Government Solutions, said the company is "knocking on doors all over Capitol Hill."

AT&T has become much more competitive since Rooney, who had previously headed federal business at Sprint, took over its federal division a year ago, said Warren Suss, president of Suss Consulting in Jenkintown, Pa. Rooney also had been chief executive officer at Priority Telecom, a competitive local exchange carrier.

"AT&T is coming on strong since their new management was put in place a year ago," Suss said. "There are a number of indicators that AT&T is going to be a more aggressive competitor than they've been in the past. They're making strategic investments in these facilities that will allow them to be more competitive," such as the Capitol Hill project.

Last fall, AT&T bought a 100-mile regional fiber network to expand its reach in the Washington, D.C., and Baltimore area, according to spokesman Jim McGann. The expanded network allows the company to offer its services on Capitol Hill and elsewhere in the area.

The buildings to be connected to the expanded network include the Russell Senate Office Building; the Hart Senate Office Building; the Jefferson, Adams and Madison buildings of the Library of Congress; the Cannon House Office Building; the Longworth House Office Building; the Rayburn House Office Building; the Ford House Annex; the Dirksen Senate Office Building; Postal Square; the Government Printing Office; GAO and the U.S. Capitol.

All 14 buildings will be connected by the end of the year, AT&T predicts.

Featured

  • Defense
    Ryan D. McCarthy being sworn in as Army Secretary Oct. 10, 2019. (Photo credit: Sgt. Dana Clarke/U.S. Army)

    Army wants to spend nearly $1B on cloud, data by 2025

    Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said lack of funding or a potential delay in the JEDI cloud bid "strikes to the heart of our concern."

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.