Letters to the editor

Following is a response to an FCW.com poll question that asked: "Is the Bush administration on the right track with the concept of consolidating IT projects?"

The concept is good, but the rapid movement to integrate systems is flawed.

User requirements are coming out of headquarters, not the field users. History shows this generates hard-to-use and hardly used systems. The federal government's past desire to build stovepiped systems was wrong, and its continued attempts to force poorly designed systems on end users will increase cost with only small gains in the end-user productivity.

F.P. Krayeski

Consultant

The administration/Office of Management and Budget is absolutely on track in the human resources information systems (HRIS) area.

It is absolutely insane and excessively wasteful for us to allow agencies to maintain, develop, re-create and pay for unique systems with grossly divergent capabilities that we will ultimately have to integrate.

The civil service workforce, rules, processing procedures and benefits are basically the same across almost all agencies. Despite the expected opposition from agency HRIS staffs, consolidation of HRIS is a very quickly achievable objective. In fact, the federal marketplace is already making it happen through extensive implementation of PeopleSoft Federal.

Name withheld by request

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