NSA names new signals intell director

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The director of the National Security Agency, Air Force Lt. Gen. Michael Hayden, announced April 10 that Army Maj. Gen. Richard Quirk III will soon become NSA's director for signals intelligence.

"Having served as the deputy director for signals intelligence since August 2002, [Maj. Gen.] Quirk has helped define the agency's [signals intelligence] transformation during such world events as the global war on terrorism and Operation Iraqi Freedom," Hayden said in a statement. "His transition to fill this key leadership position of [signals intelligence] director will be seamless, both to the agency and to our [signals intelligence] customers."

Joining Quirk in leading the signals intelligence directorate will be Charles Meals, who will move from the agency's customer relationships directorate to become deputy director.

Quirk will lead NSA's code-breaking mission into the future, Hayden said. Both appointments are effective April 21.

Prior to joining NSA in October 2001, Quirk served in a variety of Army intelligence positions including the director of intelligence for U.S. Southern Command in Panama and Miami from 1997 through 1999. He has a bachelor of science degree from the University of Miami and a masters degree in military arts and sciences. He is a graduate of various intelligence schools, the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, the School for Advanced Military Studies and the U.S. Army War College.

Meals has served in various mission positions at NSA for more than 30 years, according to the agency.

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