Oracle hires Kellogg

Even before he retired last month as the Joint Chiefs of Staff's director of command, control, communications and computers, former Army Lt. Gen. Joseph "Keith" Kellogg said he would remain in the information technology business because it requires agility and speed.

Kellogg stayed true to his word when Oracle Corp. hired him July 14 as its senior vice president of homeland security solutions. Although he doesn't have an extensive background in technology, Kellogg recognized the importance of technology to the military services, especially when it contributes to joint operations. During his tenure on the Joint Staff, Kellogg was an outspoken advocate of IT.

He said he looks forward to working with other agencies beyond the federal government. About 80 percent of infrastructure protection issues are handled at the state, local and regional levels.

"That's really where the marketplace is," Kellogg said. "Oracle has a very broad reach and broad influence in other markets not restricted to aerospace and defense. There's an incredible opportunity outside the defense industry."

Before his work on the Joint Staff, Kellogg commanded several infantry and airborne divisions, including the renowned 82nd Airborne, and was in charge of Special Operations Command Europe.

Marine Corps Lt. Gen. Robert Shea will replace Kellogg on the Joint Staff. Kellogg said the two generals worked together during his first year on the job when Shea was the Marine Corps chief information officer.

"Bob is a wonderful choice," Kellogg said. "He will do an absolutely superb job for the government and for the nation."

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