Legislating for security

At least 10 states have passed laws addressing information security, according to a report released last week by the Task Force on Protecting Democracy.

Examples include:

* Florida now allows police to investigate attacks on protected computers owned by financial institutions and government agencies.

* Until Jan. 1, 2006, California's legislature can hold closed sessions on potential threats of terrorist activity against state-owned personnel and property, including electronic data.

* Michigan imposed penalties against people who use the Internet or telecommunications systems or devices to disrupt critical infrastructure or government operations.

Featured

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    Ryan D. McCarthy being sworn in as Army Secretary Oct. 10, 2019. (Photo credit: Sgt. Dana Clarke/U.S. Army)

    Army wants to spend nearly $1B on cloud, data by 2025

    Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said lack of funding or a potential delay in the JEDI cloud bid "strikes to the heart of our concern."

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

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