DOD will split IT spending, CIO says

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — The Defense Department will change the way it describes information technology spending in the 2005 budget, its top IT official said.

DOD will break IT funding into two categories: warfighting and business, John Stenbit, the department's chief information officer, said in an Aug. 25 interview after he spoke at the Air Force IT Conference.

"We're going to be much more careful about describing business IT from warfighting IT, such that we can make some better distinctions about how much money we're putting into which," Stenbit said.

The former TRW Inc. engineer and executive performs two DOD jobs: assistant secretary of defense for networks and information integration, the job that is responsible for warfighting IT, and CIO, the job that is responsible for business IT, including accounting, finance and human resources systems.

Congress currently regards IT as a broad category that covers spy plane radars, communications satellites and DOD payroll systems, Stenbit said. "We have some communications [to improve] at the fundamental level about what's IT, how does it work, etc.," he said.

The 2004 budget discussions with Congress and the Office of Management and Budget convinced him that DOD should change the way it reports IT spending, Stenbit said. When Congress convenes next month, it will debate a $2 billion cut by the House in DOD's $24 billion 2004 IT budget.

"We need to crisp up our definitions much better," Stenbit said.

Featured

  • Defense
    Ryan D. McCarthy being sworn in as Army Secretary Oct. 10, 2019. (Photo credit: Sgt. Dana Clarke/U.S. Army)

    Army wants to spend nearly $1B on cloud, data by 2025

    Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said lack of funding or a potential delay in the JEDI cloud bid "strikes to the heart of our concern."

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.