Navy begins NSIPS transition

Defense Integrated Military Human Resources System

The Navy deployed the Navy Standard Integrated Personnel System (NSIPS) as a Web application for the first time this summer, moving from a client/server architecture to PeopleSoft Inc.'s Web architecture.

The rollout to the Web model began July 15 and will continue for the rest of this year.

Based on PeopleSoft's Human Capital Management solution, NSIPS will allow more than 453,000 active-duty and reserve Navy personnel to update and maintain personnel and pay information online using a Web browser.

"NSIPS is at the point where functionality is at full operational capability, and now we're deploying to the Web," said Bruce Triner, PeopleSoft's director of defense and special programs.

The personnel information — on records, rank, training, etc. — for active and reserve components still largely resides on a client/server architecture, but it will soon move to the Web model, said Jim Meyers, NSIPS program manager for lead software developer Lockheed Martin Information Technology.

The next milestone will be reached when Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld approves the move of pay information for active-duty personnel to the Web-based application. That approval is expected this month.

NSIPS is designed to bridge the numerous Navy legacy human resources systems until the consolidated, Defensewide system called the Defense Integrated Military Human Resources System can be deployed.

NSIPS has had its share of critics. But Navy officials defended their transition strategy, saying migrating to a Web-based PeopleSoft solution will expedite the eventual cutover to DIMHRS.

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