NIH links diet aid searchers to medical database

A National Institutes of Health Web site about dietary supplements will now link to a National Library of Medicine database through an IT maintenance contract recently awarded to a Northern Virginia company.

The 2-year-old Computer Access to Research on Dietary Supplements site, originally was designed to list all federally funded dietary supplement research in one online warehouse. Health effects of herbal and other loosely regulated supplements are difficult for consumers to judge.

CARDS now stores about 1,180 records dating from 1999; 2002 data will be added next month, and nutrition projects funded by non-NIH agencies several months after that, starting with the Agriculture Department.

With the help of Altum Inc. of Chantilly, Va., NIH’s Office of Dietary Supplements has linked CARDS to NLM’s PubMed, a database of indexed abstracts from almost 4,500 journals published in more than 70 countries.

CARDS inventories projects that are supported by federal dollars, but it doesn’t give their scientific results—a job PubMed can now for publications associated with the projects and their principal investigators.

“You can see what actually resulted” from federally funded research, said Carol Haggans, a program analyst in the Office of Dietary Supplements at NIH. “We found that’s what a lot of people were interested in.”

SRA International Inc. of Fairfax, Va., was the original NIH contractor that developed the CARDS database in 1999.

About the Author

Connect with the GCN staff on Twitter @GCNtech.


  • Congress
    U.S. Capitol (Photo by M DOGAN / Shutterstock)

    Funding bill clears Congress, heads for president's desk

    The $1.3 trillion spending package passed the House of Representatives on March 22 and the Senate in the early hours of March 23. President Trump is expected to sign the bill, securing government funding for the remainder of fiscal year 2018.

  • 2018 Fed 100

    The 2018 Federal 100

    This year's Fed 100 winners show just how much committed and talented individuals can accomplish in federal IT. Read their profiles to learn more!

  • Census
    How tech can save money for 2020 census

    Trump campaign taps census question as a fund-raising tool

    A fundraising email for the Trump-Pence reelection campaign is trying to get supporters behind a controversial change to the census -- asking respondents whether or not they are U.S. citizens.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.