Mackay resigns from VA

Department of Veterans Affairs

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Leo Mackay Jr. announced his resignation today as deputy secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Since May 2001, Mackay has overseen the daily operations of the VA, which has a budget of almost $60 million and employs more than 224,000 workers. He will officially end his tenure Sept. 30.

"Mackay brought to VA the discipline of the business world and the compassion of a man who cares deeply for America's veterans," said VA Secretary Anthony Principi. "His legacy is a more focused VA better able to meet the needs of veterans."

Upon leaving, Mackay will join Dallas-based Affiliated Computer Services (ACS) Inc. as a senior executive in the company's health care solutions business, in Atlanta. ACS provides business process and information technology outsourcing services.

"It is with a degree of sadness but an immense pride in the accomplishments of the Department of Veterans Affairs that I announce my resignation," Mackay said in a prepared statement. "It has been my sublime honor to serve President Bush, Secretary Principi — a veteran's veteran — my fellow veterans and America's citizens."

Mackay was instrumental in forming a Joint Executive Committee with the Defense Department to coordinate senior-level policies, as well as strengthening the VA's commitment to improving VA-operated national cemeteries.

A graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy and the Navy's Top Gun training program, Mackay was a vice president of Bell Helicopter Textron before his appointment to the VA.

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