EPA hires Lockheed for rule-making systems

The Environmental Protection Agency earlier this week awarded Lockheed Martin Corp. a contract to integrate federal online rule-making systems with the Regulations.gov portal under the E-Rulemaking project, one of the 25 Quicksilver initiatives.

EPA is the managing partner of the project.

The indefinite-delivery, indefinite-quantity contract is for one year with four one-year options and could be worth up to $98 million. EPA awarded the contract under the CIO Solutions and Partners II governmentwide acquisition contract managed by the National Institutes of Health.

EPA this month will award Lockheed, which beat out two other bidders, its first task order to create the systems architecture, said Oscar Morales, E-Rulemaking project director.

Lockheed also will complete the business process re-engineering that the project team started before the award, Morales said.

Under the contract, Lockheed will build the governmentwide portal and develop automated tools for rule-making writers and docket managers at more than 150 federal agencies.

The project also includes application development and maintenance of the current systems, system integration, business system architecture, business process re-engineering, networking, telecommunications and security.

Lockheed’s team includes BearingPoint Inc. of McLean, Va., Solutron Inc. of Rockville, Md., Vistronix Inc. of McLean, Va., and Xaware Inc. of Colorado Springs, Colo.

About the Author

Connect with the GCN staff on Twitter @GCNtech.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity
    cybersecurity (Rawpixel/Shutterstock.com)

    CMMC clears key regulatory hurdle

    The White House approved an interim rule to mandate defense contractors prove they adhere to existing cybersecurity standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

  • Comment
    cloud (Phaigraphic/Shutterstock.com)

    A call for visionary investment

    Investing in IT modernization is not an either-or proposition, Rep. Connolly writes. This pandemic has presented Congress a choice: We can put our head in the sand and pretend these failures didn't happen, or we can take action to be prepared for the future.

Stay Connected