Coming onstream

Streaming media was all the rage in the commercial sector a couple of years ago, and now government agencies are getting in the flow.

"It's new for government in a lot of cases," said Keith Johnson, vice president of the public sector at Akamai Technologies Inc. He compares streaming media's government progress to the delayed acceptance of enterprise resource planning software. That technology was huge in the early 1990s in the private sector, but didn't take off in government until later that decade. Government agencies use streaming media for e-learning, town meetings and news video, among other applications, industry and government executives reported. The episodic nature of some streaming products — digital video of a military operation in Iraq or Afghanistan, for example — lends itself to the bandwidth-on-demand capability of a content delivery network, service providers said. Executives believe their networks are ideal for handling sudden spikes in activity.

Featured

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

  • Comment
    Pilot Class. The author and Barbie Flowers are first row third and second from right, respectively.

    How VA is disrupting tech delivery

    A former Digital Service specialist at the Department of Veterans Affairs explains efforts to transition government from a legacy "project" approach to a more user-centered "product" method.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.