JNetDirect aims for government

Juldi Inc. has acquired NetDirect LLC and formed a new company that specializes in component software pieces for database access, security and interaction.

Called JNetDirect, the new firm's products allow Java applications to securely access Microsoft Corp.'s SQL Server databases, something that Java can't do on its own, said Burke Cox, chief executive officer of JNetDirect.

Cox had been president and CEO of Juldi, which got NetDirect's government customer base in the acquisition.

NetDirect had provided database access solutions for Sun Java programs and Microsoft SQL software. Juldi used extensible markup language (XML) for integration, but wanted to avoid the crowded enterprise application integration market.

The new company plans to continue broadening the government market, Cox said, working through systems integrators. However, small companies with unusual products often have to make their case directly to agency leaders, even if the agencies then come back to the integrator to request the products, he said.

"Systems integrators are not risk takers," Cox said. "A lot of integrators would prefer to offer a custom solution that doesn't put them at risk of failing."

Featured

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

  • Comment
    Pilot Class. The author and Barbie Flowers are first row third and second from right, respectively.

    How VA is disrupting tech delivery

    A former Digital Service specialist at the Department of Veterans Affairs explains efforts to transition government from a legacy "project" approach to a more user-centered "product" method.

  • Cloud
    cloud migration

    DHS cloud push comes with complications

    A pressing data center closure schedule and an ensuing scramble to move applications means that some Homeland Security components might need more than one hop to get to the cloud.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.