Call for nominations

This week, Federal Computer Week begins accepting nominations for its 15th annual Federal 100 awards program.

The Fed 100 recognizes government and industry employees who have played pivotal roles in the federal information technology community. Each year, FCW editors are asked how judges choose the winners. Here are a few points to consider before submitting your nominations.

n Get personal. Fed 100 awards are not given to technology or projects but to people. And the awards do not go to teams, but individuals.

Government agencies have made great strides in their use of IT during the past 15 years, and the technology itself has changed dramatically. But strong leadership is as important as ever. Typical award winners are anything but typical. They go above and beyond their daily responsibilities. They bring uncommon dedication, vision or sense of adventure to the tasks at hand.

* Impact is the key. Not only do they do their jobs well, but winners have a lasting impact on the organizations they work for or the community at large. A panel of judges, drawn from the top ranks of government and industry, will sift through hundreds of nominations in search of those people who made a difference in how IT was bought, managed or used in 2003.

* Timing is important. The Fed 100 is not a hall of fame program but a most valuable player award. It recognizes work accomplished, to a great extent, during a specific year.

Given how long some government programs run, it can be difficult to decide when an award is warranted. But the deciding factor is impact. In some cases, an individual's major accomplishment is just getting a procurement under way. In other cases, the impact comes once a project is complete.

* This is not a popularity contest. Occasionally, a person makes a big impact by pushing an unpopular agenda or by questioning conventional wisdom. Their impact may not be perceived as positive, but it's felt all the same.

* The deadline is Jan. 2, 2004. Nominate early and nominate often.

Featured

  • Defense
    Ryan D. McCarthy being sworn in as Army Secretary Oct. 10, 2019. (Photo credit: Sgt. Dana Clarke/U.S. Army)

    Army wants to spend nearly $1B on cloud, data by 2025

    Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said lack of funding or a potential delay in the JEDI cloud bid "strikes to the heart of our concern."

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.