Technology Briefs

NetScreen offers application security

Officials at NetScreen Technologies Inc. took steps recently to protect organizations from application-level attacks that can go undetected by network firewalls.

The company has unveiled its new Deep Inspection firewall, which thwarts attacks targeted at Web, e-mail and file transfer resources, according to company officials. Information technology managers are finding that they need more advanced intrusion-prevention capabilities to thwart attacks that target application weaknesses.

Deep Inspection tries to satisfy that demand by closely inspecting Internet traffic for anomalies in protocols such as HTTP, Simple Mail Transfer Protocol, Internet Message Access Protocol, Post Office Protocol, FTP and the Domain Name Service.

IT managers can configure the Deep Inspection protection on a per-policy basis for one, several or all supported protocols.

The company also introduced NetScreen-Security Manager 2004, a management platform that controls and monitors device, network and security configuration and policies.

IBM earns security stamp

IBM Corp. continues its quest to provide secure products for government agencies.

The company's Web access management software, Tivoli Access Manager, has achieved Common Criteria security certification. Common Criteria is a standardized testing and approval process for security products recognized by 16 countries, including the United States.

IBM's software has earned Evaluation Assurance Level 3. Tivoli Access Manager allows IT managers to enforce and audit policies for information access across application servers, portals, directories and custom applications.

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