Adobe acquires XML developer

Adobe Systems Inc. has acquired the technology assets of Yellow Dragon Software Corp., a developer of Extensible Markup Language messaging and metadata management products.

Adobe officials believe the acquisition will strengthen the company's XML architecture. Yellow Dragon, a privately held firm based in Vancouver, British Columbia, has products that use Electronic Business eXtensible Markup Language, a technical framework for consistently using XML to exchange business data.

Adobe is counting on an intelligent document approach based on XML to open government and commercial markets. Combining XML with the PDF format makes it possible to create forms that users can manipulate without sacrificing security, Adobe officials said.

"The addition of Yellow Dragon is a powerful extension to the Adobe Intelligent Document Platform," said Ivan Koon, senior vice president of the intelligent document business unit at Adobe, in a statement. "We believe Yellow Dragon's technology will enable us to offer XML functionality, which will be mandated by governments and businesses over the next few years. We also gain experienced engineers who are active in the XML standards arena and who helped define the ebXML standard." The company did not disclose financial terms of the deal.

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