GPO names new chief information officer

U.S. Government Printing Office

The U.S. Government Printing Office announced today that Reynold Schweickhardt has been tabbed to lead the agency's technological infrastructure transformation as GPO's new chief information officer.

Schweickhardt moves into the CIO slot from his former position as GPO's information resources management policy manager. As CIO, he will oversee the agency's developing infrastructure for the government's future digital information products and services.

Prior to joining GPO, Schweickhardt was director of technology at the House Administration Committee. He guided the implementation of the House's business-continuity/disaster-recovery infrastructure. He also initiated a digital mail pilot program in response to the anthrax crisis and oversaw the rollout of several emergency communication systems for members of Congress, including RIM Ltd. BlackBerry communication devices and Government Emergency Telecommunications Service cards.

Before he joined the federal government, Schweickhardt was a software engineer and project manager at Hewlett-Packard Co.

"We like Reynold's blend of cutting-edge private-sector experience coupled with his extensive knowledge of the federal government's systems and requirements," said Deputy Public Printer William Turri, GPO's chief operating officer. "He has the know-how needed to design and operate the systems that will be required by a 21st century government information processing and distribution organization."

In addition to his duties as CIO, Schweickhardt will also serve as a member of GPO's Management Council, which establishes agency policies.

GPO is responsible for the production and distribution of information products for the federal government. On the GPO's Web site, more than 250,000 federal document titles are available to the public.

Featured

  • Defense
    Ryan D. McCarthy being sworn in as Army Secretary Oct. 10, 2019. (Photo credit: Sgt. Dana Clarke/U.S. Army)

    Army wants to spend nearly $1B on cloud, data by 2025

    Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said lack of funding or a potential delay in the JEDI cloud bid "strikes to the heart of our concern."

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.